What Women Need to Know to Take Control of Their Financial Future - Part I

What Women Need to Know to Take Control of Their Financial Future

Here are the facts: Women are living longer than men[i] and nearly 50% of all marriages are likely to end in divorce (with even higher rates of “Gray Divorce,” or divorces amongst those over age 50). What does this mean for women? That at some point in their lives, whether through divorce, widowhood, or personal choice, the responsibility of financial management will land squarely on their shoulders.

Women have made impressive strides over the past few generations with more than half of American women acting as the primary breadwinner in their household. Today, women are working and earning more than ever before.

But when it comes to money matters, a striking number of women statistically still leave the responsibility of financial management up to men. Experts attribute this trend to a lack of confidence in financial decision making, the female focus on caregiving and homemaking, and even just traditional, societal norms; but regardless of this tendency, longer life expectancies and higher divorce rates indicate that women should empower themselves to take control of their financial futures sooner rather than later.

The main problem, however, is that many women are unsure of where to begin. In fact, over 40% of women say that a lack of knowledge regarding their financial affairs is the single largest deterrent to becoming more involved in money management.[ii]

With this in mind, we have formatted this article into two installments to help women overcome their financial challenges and take control of their future.

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What You Need to Know About Estimating Taxes in Retirement

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Income is income, in retirement or otherwise, and where there is income, there is tax. Even though your income in retirement will be coming from different sources, such as IRAs, pensions, or social security, in most cases you’ll still be responsible for paying taxes on what you receive or withdraw.

Many, if not most, retirees rely on multiple different sources of income to fund their golden years including, but not limited to, the following:

• Social Security Income
• Pension Plans
• Traditional IRA and 401(k) withdrawals
• Roth IRA or Roth 401 (k)s withdrawals
• Investment Income

Each type of income incurs unique tax rules and liabilities and will affect your take-home amount in different ways. In order to minimize the tax burden on your overall income and accommodate for those taxes in your budget, you’ll need to understand how each different type of income is taxed.

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Can You Work Your Way into Retirement?

As 2016 ended, the 17th Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey appeared and noted a preference for a phased retirement among a majority (53%) of workers polled by the insurance and investment company's Center for Retirement Studies. In fact, 48% of the pre-retirees surveyed felt that their current employer would allow them to continue working in some capacity after age 65.

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Regulatory Disclosure: The information on this website has been obtained from sources considered reliable, but its accuracy and completeness are not guaranteed. This website is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation to buy any securities. Gerard Gruber offers Securities and Investment Advisory and Financial Planning service through Geneos Wealth Management, Inc, Member FINRA/SIPC.  Investments are not FDIC insured. Investments are not deposits of the financial institution and are not guaranteed by a financial institution. Investments are subject to investment risks including loss of principal amount invested.